The Victoria Cross

Royal Artillery VC

Royal Artillery

VC

Victoria Cross
Royal Artillery VCs'
Name
Date
Campaign (Place)
Regt / Bty
Bt Lt Col C Dickson
17 Oct 1854
Crimea (Sebastapol)
Rt Siege Train RA
CSM A Henry
5 Nov 1854
Crimea (Inkerman)
4 Coy 11 Bn RA
Lt F Miller
5 Nov 1854
Crimea (Inkerman)
4 Coy 12 Bn RA
Capt M C Dixon
17 Apr 1855
Crimea (Sebastapol)
5 Coy 9 Bn RA
Sgt G Symons
6 Jun 1855
Crimea (Sebastapol)
6 Coy 11 Bn RA
Gnr & Dvr T Arthur
7 & 18 Jun 1855
Crimea (Sebastapol)
1 Coy 5 Bn RA
Bdr D Cambridge
8 Sep 1855
Crimea (Sebastapol)
8 Coy 11 Bn RA
2/Capt G Davis
8 Sep 1855
Crimea (Sebastapol)
2 Coy 5 Bn RA
Lt C C Teesdale
29 Sep 1855
Crimea (Kars)
Staff (ADC) RA
Gnr W Connolly
7 Jul 1857
Indian Mutiny (Jhelum)
1 Tp 3 Bde Ben HA
Lt J Hills-Johnes
9 Jul 1857
Indian Mutiny (Delhi)
2 Tp 1 Bde Ben HA
Bt Major H Tombs
9 Jul 1857
Indian Mutiny (Delhi)
2 Tp 1 Bde Ben HA
Capt G A Renny
16 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Delhi)
5 Tp 1 Bde Ben HA
Capt W Olpherts
25 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
2 Coy 3 Bn Ben Arty
Bdr J Thomas
27 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
4 Coy 1 Bn Ben Arty
Sgt B Diamond
28 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Boolundshur)
2 Tp 3 Bde Ben HA
Gnr R Fitzgerald
28 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Boolundshur)
2 Tp 3 Bde Ben HA
2/Capt F C Maude
25 Sep 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
3 Coy 8 Bn RA
Lt H E Harrington
14-22 Nov 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
3 Coy 1 Bn Ben Arty
R Rider E Jennings
14-22 Nov 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
1 Tp 1 Bde Ben HA
Gnr J Park
14-22 Nov 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
2 Coy 4 Bn Ben Arty
Gnr T Laughnan
14-22 Nov 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
2 Coy 6 Bn Ben Arty
Gnr H McInnes
14-22 Nov 1857
Indian Mutiny (Lucknow)
3 Coy 1 Bn Ben Arty
Lt F S Roberts
2 Jan 1858
Indian Mutiny (Khodagunge)
Staff (DAQMG) Ben Arty
Bt Maj R H Keatinge
17 Mar 1858
Indian Mutiny (Chundairee)
Political Offr Bom Arty
Bdr J Brennen
3 Apr 1858
Indian Mutiny (Jhansi)
5 Coy 14 Bn RA
Lt Patrick Roddy
27 Sept 1858
Indian Mutiny (Kuthirga)
Ensign Bengal Army
Lt A F Pickard
20 Nov 1863
New Zealand (Rangiri)
C Bty 4 Bde RA
Asst-Surg W Temple
20 Nov 1863
New Zealand (Rangiri)
C Bty 4 Bde RA
Asst-Surg W G N Manley
29 Apr 1864
New Zealand (Tauranga)
1 Bty 4 Bde RA
Sgt P Mullane
27 Jul 1880
Afghanistan (Maiwand)
E Bty B Bde RHA
Gnr J Collis
28 Jul 1880
Afghanistan (Maiwand)
E Bty B Bde RHA
Gnr A Smith
17 Jan 1885
Soudan (Abu Klea)
1 Bty 1 Bde S Div RA
Capt H N Schofield
15 Dec 1899
S. Africa (Colenso)
Staff (ADC) RA
Capt H L Reed
15 Dec 1899
S. Africa (Colenso)
7 Bty RFA
Cpl G E Nurse
15 Dec 1899
S. Africa (Colenso)
66 Bty RFA
Maj E J Phipps-Hornby
31 Mar 1900
S. Africa (Sanna’s Post)
Q Bty RHA
Sgt C E H Parker
31 Mar 1900
S. Africa (Sanna’s Post)
Q Bty RHA
Gnr I Lodge
31 Mar 1900
S. Africa (Sanna’s Post)
Q Bty RHA
Dvr H H Glasock
31 Mar 1900
S. Africa (Sanna’s Post)
Q Bty RHA
Dvr F H Bradley
27 Sep 1901
S. Africa (Itala)
69 Bty RFA
Shoe Smith A E Ind
20 Dec 1901
S. Africa (Tafel Kop)
11 Pom-Pom Sect RHA
Lt Col E W Alexander
25 Aug 1914
WW 1 (Elouges)
119 Bty RA
Capt D Reynolds
26 Aug & 9 Sep 14
WW 1 (Le Cateau)
37 Bty RFA
Dvr J H C Drain
26 Aug 1914
WW 1 (Le Cateau)
37 Bty RFA
Dvr F Luke
26 Aug 1914
WW 1 (Le Cateau)
37 Bty RFA
Capt E K Bradbury
1 Sep 1914
WW 1 (Nery)
L Bty RHA
BSM G T Dorrell
1 Sep 1914
WW 1 (Nery)
L Bty RHA
Sgt D Nelson
1 Sep 1914
WW 1 (Nery)
L Bty RHA
Bdr E G Horlock
15 Sep 1914
WW 1 (Vendresse)
113 Bty RFA
Capt G N Walford
26 Apr 1915
WW1 (Gallipoli)
Staff (BRMRA)
A/Sgt J C Raynes
11-12 Oct 1915
WW 1 (Fos 7 de Bethune)
A Bty 71 Bde RFA
Capt L W B Rees
1 Jul 1916
WW 1 (Flying Duties)
Attached to RFC
Sgt W Gosling
3 Apr 1917
WW 1 (Vimy)
V/51 Trench Mortar)
2/Lt T H B Maufe
4 Jun 1917
WW 1 (Feuchy)
124 Siege Bty RGA
T/Lt S T D Wallace
30 Nov 1917
WW 1 (Cambrai)
C Bty 63 Bde RFA
Sgt C E Gourley
30 Nov 1917
WW 1 (Cambrai)
D Bty 276 Bde RFA
Gnr C E Stone
21 Mar 1918
WW 1 (St Quentin)
C Bty 83 Bde RFA
Lt E S Dougall
10 Apr 1918
WW 1 (Messines)
A Bty 88 Bde RFA
T/Lt R V Gorle
1 Oct 1918
WW 1 (Ledgehem)
A Bty 50 Bde RFA
Maj J C Campbell
21-22 Nov 1941
WW 2 (Sidi Rezegh)
Staff
2/Lt G W Gunn
21 Nov 1941
WW 2 (Sidi Rezegh)
J Bty RHA
Lt P A Porteous
19 Aug 1942
WW 2 (Dieppe)
No 4 Commando
U Singh
15-16 Dec 1944
WW2 (Kaladan River)
Indian Artillery

General

Ever since its institution the Cross has been supplied by the well-known London jewellers, Messrs. Hancocks and Co., now of Burlington Gardens London W1. The Cross and suspender are first cast in gunmetal and then chased and finished by hand; from 1914 to 1950 a die-cast suspender was used. The metal is taken from guns captured from the Russians in the Crimean War although during and after the First World War it is fairly certain that metal from captured Chinese guns was used for a short period. The components of the decoration are then treated chemically to obtain the uniform dark brown finish which is darker on some issues than on others. The Cross is 1.375 inches wide and, together with the suspender bar and link, weighs about 0.87 ounces troy, although chasing and finishing may cause slight variation in these figures. The design of the Cross is attributed to H.H. Armstead who at the time of its inception was working for Hancocks, the design then being approved by the Queen.

 

Ribbon

Crimson (described as red in the Warrents), 1.5 inches wide. Originally the ribbon was dark blue or the Royal Navy and crimson for the Army. Shortly before the Royal Air Force was formed on 1st April 1918 the King approved the recommendation that what had been the Army ribbon should be adopted by all recipients. When the ribbon is worn alone a miniature of the Cross is pinned on it, a bar being indicated by a second miniature worn beside the first (when first approved in 1916, a single miniature indicated the award of a bar; from 1917 this was changed to the current configuration).

 

Suspension

By a straight bar, slotted for the ribbon, with a V-lug below, made in one piece. The front of the bar is ornamented with laurels (the die-cast bars having the leaves set more closely together), and the reverse engraved with details of the recipient. The Cross and suspender bar are joined by a small link which passes through the lugs of both components. On earlier issues the link is completely circular and the inside bottom of the V-lug slightly recessed to accommodate it. Later the link was made oval and the lug not recessed.

 

Obverse

In reality the Cross is not a Maltese Cross, as it is described in the Royal Warrents, but is closer to a cross patté.

 

Reverse

The date (or dates), of the act of gallantry is engraved in the centre circle.

 

Bars

This is based on the suspender bar but without the V-lug, ribbon and frame above. The reverse is engraved with details of the recipient and the date or dates of the act.

 

Naming

Details of the recipient are engraved in capital letters on the reverse of the suspender bar, and the date or dates of the act of gallantry in the centre circle of the reverse of the Cross. The style of engraving varies although, generally speaking, the use of serifs seem to have been discontinued during the South African War (Boer) War. However, King Edward VII having approved postumous issues, some comparatively modern Crosses exist which were awarded for services performed many years before. Sometimes the inscription is of the same colour as the decoration itself. The latter practise seems to have been more general before the Boer War although thereafter no particular pattern is apparent.

The details on the suspender bar include the rank, name and regiment, or other description of the recipient. Abbreviations are used, according to the length of the inscription, and during the First World War the practise of adding the regimental or equivalent number in the case of recipients below commissioned rank was introduced. Occasionally the recipient’s full (or abbreviated) first names appear. The FirstWorld War and later inscriptions tend to be fuller than those appearing previously. The details on the reverse of the Cross give the date or dates of the act concerned, the month usually being abbreviated.

 

Re-issues

Occasionally a recipient has been issued with a replacement which, in itself, cannot readily be detected, although suspicion may be aroused if the accompanying medals are themselves replacement issues. Hancocks are able to say if a replacement has been issued.

 

Copies and Fakes

Various types of copy exist, some cast examples being very well made indeed. However, due to the cooling of the metal in the mould, they are slightly smaller than the genuine Crosses and not of the correct weight. Nevertheless, Hancocks do not consider the weight of great importance as the thickness of the decoration can vary, especially with early issues.
Some copies are struck from dies which, together with some of those cast, are poorly finished and of too light a colour. On one type of copy the sides of the suspender bar are not straight but have a curved excrescence either side of the ribbon slot, while another type has V-shaped niches at either end of the ribbon slot. Some years ago a particularly well-made copy appeared on the market; in this, however, the inner diameter of the centre circle of the reverse is 14mm which is too wide and hence relatively easily recognisable. Some copies have been faked by the addition of details of actual recipients although usually the engraving is of poor quality. Hancocks can almost invariably state whether a Cross is genuine or not.